EMBRACE DIVERSITY; End Discrimination In Uganda!

A press release by the CSCHRCL - Human Rights Day (10 December 2009).  “All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights” is the bold opening statement of Article 1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), adopted on December 10, 1948 to try and ensure that the horrors of World War II - most notably the de-liberate extermination of Jews, Gypsies and homosexuals by the Nazis - would never again be visited on anybody. It is extremely ironic that the chosen theme for this year’s International Human Rights Day in Uganda is ‘Em-brace Diversity, End Discrimination in Uganda’ when parliament is currently considering a bill that rejects diversity and promotes discrimination.
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Giving With One Hand and Taking with the Other: HowForced Migrants living with HIV/AIDS are affected by Legislation

".....While Uganda is widely celebrated as a country withmodel refugee legislation, and was once also regarded as a model for combating the HIV/AIDS pandemic, we note with deepening concern that when it comes to forced migrants and HIV/AIDS, there are some serious obstacles to effective support which would  enable our clients to enjoy their human rights and lead dignified lives. What we are left with is a context in which forced migrants are given protection with one hand… only to find that what it has been taken away with the other!......"
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Transitional Justice is key to addressing the challenge of mass displacement in Africa

A press release made by Refugee Law Project ahead of the African Union special summit on refugees, Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) and returnees in Africa , 19 October 2009)
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No Body is Immune: Gender Against Men

A press release made in connection to the RLP video documentary, "Gender Against Men", that was launched on 4 June 2009. The documentary explores the hidden world of sexual and gender based violence against men in the conflicts  of the Great Lakes region; it  is a movie about  men, violence, and the inability of society to recognize or address male vulnerability in times of conflict. The movie raises as many questions as it gives answers in its quest for an honest examination of the gender stereotypes underlying mainstream approaches to sexual and gender based violence (SGBV).
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