Reflections on relationships between the environment and forced migration

By Decimon Anywar (Published 23rd March 2018)

This week, from 17-23 March 2018, Uganda held its first ever Uganda Water and Environment Week, timed to coincide with International Day of Forests (21st March), World Water Day (22nd March) and World Meteorological Day (23rd March). It is important that in the course of this week we were able to reflect on the complex relationships and interactions between the environment and forced migration.  

Involvement of Men could help Promote Adult Women’s Literacy

By Akullu Barbra (Published 21st March 2018)

The world, recently commemorated another International Women’s Day. It is an important day around which to take stock of achievements towards gender equality, as well as the challenges that continue to confront women and girls worldwide. This year’s commemoration once again unveiled the need to advance the discussion on working with men and boys to end violence against women and girls. While at the national level, the Ministry of Health has promoted the need to engage men and boys in family planning programmes and ante-natal care (a model that has realized relative successes), the numerous events to stand with and support women and girls that were organized on Women’s Day by government and non-governmental actors, left a number of critical issues to ponder about. 

Giving hope to visually impaired woman in Palabek Refugee Settlement

By Francis Olanya (Published 8th March 2018)

As we commemorate International Women’s Day in Uganda under the theme “Empowerment of Rural Women and Girls: Opportunities and Challenges”, we are reminded that rural women and girls including refugee women and girls still have limited access to learning opportunities as a core empowerment strategy: The Global Education Monitoring report by UNESCO (2016) highlights that 63% of women have not attained minimum literacy skills.

Myth and Reality in Post-Conflict northern Uganda: Can Interfacing with Ghosts and Spirits Heal War Victims and Conflict-Affected Communities?

By Benard Okot Kasozi (Published 5th January 2018)

Introduction

Complex beliefs and psychology revolving around the existence of “life after death”, as well as manifestations of spirits of the dead interfacing with the living, are widespread in many post-conflict communities across the globe. As a psychosocial researcher involved since 2007 in transitional justice and the study of war-related trauma in Uganda, particularly in the Greater Northern Uganda, I have come across widespread claims and complaints that the ghosts or spirits of people killed during conflicts continue to disturb survivors in conflict-affected communities.

Invisible and Forgotten: Refugees Living with Disabilities

By Francis Okot Oyat (Published 4th December 2017)

On Sunday 3rd December we once again commemorated International Day of Disabled Persons under the theme Transformation Towards Sustainable and Resilient Society for All”. It is an important day proclaimed and observed by the United Nations since 1992 for promoting and creating awareness about the plights of persons living with

Refugees, Mental Health and the Work Place

By Yusrah Nagujja, Anthony Ochora & Jaclyn Kerr (Published 10th October 2017)

The theme for this World Mental Health Day, is “Mental Health in the Work Place”. With over 300 million people suffering from depression worldwide and 260 million suffering with anxiety disorders (WHO, 2017), it is estimated that these disorders result in approximately US$1 trillion in lost productivity within the global economy (WHO, 2017). Thus, this theme is quite timely.

Behind the scenes

By Darius King Kabafunzaki (Published 29th September 2017)

Many a time, we subconsciously come to conclusions about certain things that we do not actually know very well. For example as a young boy while growing up, I used to think to myself that driving a car was as easy as pushing my toy car all over the floor. My ultimate love at that time though was riding a motorbike and I still felt I could ride a motorbike just as easily as I thought I could drive a car. 

The Tears of Living with Untreated War Traumas in Post-Conflict northern Uganda

By Okot Benard Kasozi (Published 25th September 2017)

On 28th August 2017, I received a phone call from a war victims’ representative in Moyo, a district located on the border with South Sudan approximately 470 kilometers northwest of Uganda’s capital city Kampala. He was concerned about the daunting number of people in the district/sub-region living with as yet untreated war injuries sustained during violent armed insurgency over the period 1995-1998. More than twenty years later he still hoped the victims might be assisted to recover and heal from the untreated visible and invisible war wounds.

Beasts of burden: Unaccompanied refugee children biting more than they can swallow

By Francis Okot Oyat (Published on 13th September 2017)

In many African countries confronted with escalating conflict, protection issues of children remain a major challenge. UNHCR says children make up to 62% of the 1.8 million people displaced by fighting in South Sudan, and more than 75,000 unaccompanied minors have fled to Uganda, Kenya and Ethiopia. (Sudan Tribune, 18th May 2017).  In conflict situations children are exposed to a wide range of abuses, including defilement, abduction and forceful recruitment into military forces or groups, sexual slavery and exploitation leading to early pregnancy and early parenthood, brutal murder of adults creating unaccompanied and orphaned children, torture and physical brutality, and forceful displacement. Refugee children with limited physical and psychological

Contact Us

+256 (0) 414 343 556

+256 (0) 800-100555

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mon-Fri 9:00-17:00

Plot 7&6 Coronation Road, Old Kampala, Kamplala (Opp. Old Kampala Primary School)
 

 

Join Our Emailing List