Tackling Conflict-related Sexual Violence: How much are we tapping from young people’s creativity?

By Onen David Ongwech (Published 10th July 2017)

I recently found my commitment to tackling conflict-related sexual violence (CRSV) reinvigorated when I took an important trip to Bath College’s New Perspectives exhibition on June 20, 2017 to support a magnificent piece of art on display which illuminates the plight of male survivors of CRSV. This trip came ahead of the World Refugee Day, Uganda Solidarity Refugee Summit on Refugees, and UN Day Against Torture.

Killing two birds with one stone: Strategic use of media

By Darius King Kabafunzaki (Published 11th November 2016)

The Media for Social Change (M4SC) programme of the Refugee Law Project was recently mandated by the International Crimes Division (ICD) of the High Court of Uganda to document the proceedings of the pre-trial conference for Thomas Kwoyelo, a former Lord’s Resistance Army commander, that took place on 15th – 16th August 2016 at Gulu High Court. This followed a recommendation by the Democratic Governance Facility (DGF), one of our major funders, having noted our growing reputation and record of using media for advocacy and awareness creation. 

RLP’s English for Adults: A lifeline for urban refugees in Kampala

By Charles Waddimba (Published 4th November 2016)

Uganda is home to 695,386 refugees and asylum seekers (Office of the Prime Minister, September 2016) mostly originating from neighboring countries within the Great Lakes Region of Africa such as South Sudan, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Rwanda, Burundi, Somalia, Gambia, Benin, Ethiopia, and Eritrea among others. This number is likely to rise still further given the political upheaval in Burundi and South Sudan.

Clipped Wings

By Dorah Kukunda (Published 31st October 2016)

When I was much younger, I was naughty and overly outspoken and so, I often found myself in trouble. Sure I got my share of canes but what I remember was that even then, my mother always encouraged me to ‘speak my mind’ and never to keep silent when I knew that something was wrong and because of that I grew up knowing to speak out when I felt something was not fair which has over the years shaped me and looking back, I can say that I am grateful to my ‘big head’ and to my mother’s wise words which have helped me to never settle for less. 

Psychological First Aid Provision for Urban Refugees in Uganda: Opportunities and Dilemmas

By Kampogo Mary Tumusiime and Yusrah Nagujja Kuteesa (Published 10th October 2016)

World Mental Health Day was first celebrated on 10th October 1992, nearly quarter of a century ago. This year the theme set by the World Health Organisation calls us to address the question of “Psychological first aid”.

Psychological First Aid refers to a range of natural, supportive and practical strategies used to reduce the painful range of emotions and responses experienced by people who are or have been exposed to high stress. Psychological first aid emphasizes listening without pressing the person to talk; assessing needs and concerns; ensuring that basic physical needs are met; providing or mobilizing social support, and providing essential information. 

No Pride in Ageing: The Plight of Elderly Refugees in Uganda

By Okot Francis Oyat (Published 3rd October 2016)

On December 14, 1990, the UN General Assembly made October 1 as the International Day of Older Persons, following up on initiatives such as the Vienna International Plan of Action on Ageing, which was adopted by the 1982 World Assembly on Ageing and endorsed later that year by the Assembly. The International Day of Older Persons was observed for the first time throughout the world on 1 October 1991, the same year the UN General Assembly adopted the United Nations Principles for Older Persons. In 2002 the second World Assembly on Ageing adopted the Madrid International Plan of Action on Ageing to respond to the opportunities and challenges of population ageing in the 21st century and to promote the development of a society for all ages. This year’s commemoration is under the theme Take a Stand Against Ageism.

Empowerment as a substitute to direct services model: Experiences from the basic video advocacy training for refugees

By Dieudonne Maganya (Published 29th August 2016)

Early 2014, the Refugee Law Project (RLP), School of Law Makerere University together with Institute for Development Studies (IDS) jointly delivered a weeklong training to a peer support group of male victims of conflict-related sexual violence. The training was on how to use film to advocate for self. The experience was thrilling and besides the empowerment and the skills, a short film was made out of that experience. The group used that short film, “The Bench”, as a launch-pad to more ambitious projects in audio-visual media.

Address mental health to fight dependency syndrome in post-conflict northern Uganda

By Okot Benard Kasozi (Published 22nd July 2016)

Mental health is globally recognized as one of the leading causes of disability. However, a significant number of professional and non-professional stakeholders have trouble drawing connections between the implications of poor mental health status and some of the current socio-economic and conflict issues in Uganda that continue to dwindle citizens’ active participation in national development and harmonious co-existence. In northern Uganda, which suffered from brutal armed insurgencies and mass displacement for decades, the nature of the relationship between deep-seated dependency syndrome and mental health remains a challenge. 

65 years on, 65 million people forcibly displaced!

By Davis Uwizeye (Published 28th July 2016)

Today, 28th July 2016, marks sixty-five years since the adoption of the 1951 UNITED NATIONS CONVENTION RELATING TO THE STATUS OF REFUGEES, a refugee protection instrument that was adopted on 28th July 1951 to address the refugee crisis in Europe in the aftermath of the Second World War. It was later amended by the 1967 Protocol to remove the limitations of time and geographical boundaries, thus making it a universal instrument. It is both a status and rights-based instrument that is underpinned by a number of fundamental principles most notably; non-discrimination, non-penalization and non-refoulement.

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