What About Us? The Exclusion of Urban IDPs From Uganda's IDP Related Policies and Interventions (Dec 2007)

Violent conflict between the Uganda People’s Defence Forces (UPDF) and the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) has plagued northern Uganda for the past 20 years. At its peak, the conflict displaced at least two million people,many of whom fled to or were forced into notoriously unsafe and inhumane camps for internally displaced persons (IDPs) known as “protected villages”............ then the ongoing exclusion and marginalisation of urban-based IDPs from these return processes will be problematic for subsequent transitional justice and reintegration processes as envisaged under the Accountability and Reconciliation Agreement signed by the Government of Uganda (GoU) and  the LRA.
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Rapid Assessment of Population Movement in Gulu and Pader

This briefing paper presents preliminary analysis of research conducted with IDPs in Gulu and Pader in 16 “new settlement” and “decongestion” sites in six different sub-counties from 12-22 May 2007. The research team used a combination of forty-two in-depth one-on-one interviews and ten focus group discussions with IDPs. Additional interviews were also conducted with key government  and agency officials in the said districts. While a rapid assessment cannot claim tomake a definitive statement on the situation, the intention of this briefing is to shed light on dynamics surrounding population movement, in order to better understand  what the decongestion and resettlement sites represent, and to raise issues requiring further investigation.
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Repatriation Exercise in Rhino Camp Refugee settlement, Arua district

The Refugee Law Project (RLP) Legal Aid and Counseling (LAC) Department conducted in-depth interviews in Mid March 2007 with refugees living in the Camp, with the neighbouring host community local leaders, government and UN officials and NGO staff working in the settlement.
The following represents findings related to the most salient issues that emerged from the visit to Rhino Refugee Settlement Camp, Arua and will be followed by a more in-depth analysis in report form. This preliminary document is circulated so asto inform the key stakeholders of the issues that prevailed in Rhino Refugee Settlement Camp in the face of the ongoing repatriation at the time of the visit. Feel free to write back any comments on this paper within the time space of two weeks from date of receipt as a final report will be circulated in this regard and uploaded on our website.
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Humanitarian Protection in Uganda: A Trojan Horse?

Protection in Practice Background Paper, Humanitarian Policy Group (Overseas Development Institute), December 2006. Chris Dolan & Lucy Hovil
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Disclaimer:
This report has been commissioned by the HPG. The opinions expressed herein are of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the Humanitarian Policy Group or of the Overseas Development Institute.

Madi Okollo Refugee Settlement: A Different Approach to Refugee Settlement

This brief represents preliminary findings on three of the most salient issues that emerged from the visit to Arua: village structure and vulnerable groups, education and early marriage, and repatriation. It will be followed by a more in-depth Working Paper once the research data collected over the course of the four trips has been analysed. This briefing was circulated to key stakeholders for comment prior to its publication on our website.
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"Only Peace Can Restore the Confidence of the Displaced"

Update on the implementation of the recommendations made by the United Nations Secretary-General's Representative on Internally Displaced Persons following his visit to Uganda. Report commissioned by Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC) Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre (IDMC) 2nd Edition, October 2006
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Refugees in Rhino Camp Refugee Settlement and Arua Town

The RLP conducted over 200 in-depth interviews in Arua District in late July and early August 2006, some with self-settled refugees living in Arua town and the majority with refugees living in Rhino Camp Refugee Settlement. Government officials and UN and NGO staff working in the settlement and in Arua and Rhino Camp towns were also interviewed. This brief represents preliminary findings related to three of the most salient issues that emerged from the visit to Arua, and will be followed by a more in-depth analysis once all the field studies have been completed. An earlier draft of this document has been circulated to a number of key stakeholders for preliminary comment. However, the RLP welcomes any further comment which can inform our final research output.
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Beyond Vulnerable Groups: Briefing note on Kitgum and Gulu Districts

In a context where nearly all residents of Gulu and Kitgum are displaced, government and humanitarian actors have increasingly sought to target those with the greatest need through the identification of ‘vulnerable groups.’ This amorphous population has typically included women, children, the sick, disabled, and elderly. Taken together, these groups in fact form the majority of the internally displaced population of northern Uganda, making the term ‘vulnerable’ almost meaningless. One of the principal findings of this research was that the ‘vulnerable groups’ approach serves to oversimplify the complex socio-economic dynamics that impact upon IDPs’ full enjoyment of human rights. It ignores the ways in which members  of particular  groups take steps to mitigate against their so-called vulnerabilities.
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Education and displacement in Uganda: RLP Advocacy Briefs (2005)

Refugees and Internally Displaced People often see education of their children as the principal way of ensuring a better future for their family. However, education in exile is often less than adequate at promoting either present or future stability. Children, parents, and teachers face numerous educational challenges in situations of displacement. More important, though, is how to address these challenges.  Advocacy workshops held in three refugee-hosting areas in Uganda involved stakeholders in planning the way forward.  Participants included parents, pupils, teachers, community leaders, UNHCR staff, implementing  partner staff, Office of the Prime Minister staff, and Ministry of Education representatives.

  1. Education and displacement in Uganda: Report on workshop in Nakivale refugee settlement (Sep 2005)
  2. Education and displacement in Uganda: Report on workshop in Kampala (Aug 2005)
  3. Education and displacement in Uganda: Report on workshop in Kyaka II refugee settlement (Aug 2005)
  4. Education and displacement in Uganda: Challenges and Way Forward (2005)

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